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Letter of James Abercromby, 1755 Sept. 5.

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has been carryd so far that I have been told that they knew very well, how to cut this matter short, by sending over another Receiver who knew his Duty, and I have reason to believe, that governeur Dinwiddies early zeal, in remonstrating against this warrant, met with a [civil?] reception here, and Mr Habburgs opposition thereto, with a very severe reprimand, I shall not take upon me to state to you, the principles on which Mr Habburg grounded his opposition and objections to the Kings warrant, but from the language that I have met with since this matter has came into my hands, I am apt to believe that he must have called in question the Right of the Crown to apply the Tobacco Duty in any Instance whatever, a Doctrine no doubt extreamly alarming to the Crown & by no means tenable, by the Law, nor from practise, witness the address from the Council to the Crown for additional Salarys from this [hand?] hence there arises a tenaciousness in the Ministry to parry and defeat every measure that points like an attack upon the Crown, in this case, bearing some sort of resemblance to the case of Public [Meeting?] in Ireland, which is now become very embarrassing to the Councils of this Kingdom Intangled with such prejudices and difficultys I found it was best for me to labor the case upon the abstracted points of the law and of policy of state [?] that the Thousand pounds paid to So Carolina was straining the law of Virginia, but to this it has been said, that securing the peace & friendship of the Indians does manifestly tend to the security of Virginia and accordingly on this principle the King thought fit to apply ye one thousand pounds to this service, thro’ the bonds of